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Over-Demanding Employers Spurring “Gig Economy”

Frustrated_man_at_a_desk_(cropped)

Corporate life in New York City is infamous for being grueling, demanding, fast paced, and intense. Still, the bustle of the city that never sleeps attracts the brightest minds. Yet despite the recent upturn in the economy, workers are unhappier than ever with the increasing demand that seems to have gotten out of hand as of late. People are working more hours for less money, and frustrated with the results. Additionally, the cost of living in New York has rapidly outgrown average salary growth. Here are a few key ways that employees are adapting to what is increasingly shifting towards what experts are calling “the gig economy:”

  • Freelancing Becomes Norm: With employees feeling like they’re working around the clock anyways, many are figuring: why not work for myself? Many employees are supplementing their income (or replacing it entirely) with freelance work where they often make more money than they otherwise would have.
  • Layoffs Burdening Star Employees: Managers seeing big returns from layoffs of low performing employees are continuing to do so at the expense of over-burdened high efficiency employees, resulting in only 19% of employees in industries like the tech industry being “very happy” with their job.
  • Growth is Misleading: Most of the job growth has been in the healthcare, fast food and retail industries where salaries average below $25,000 a year.

So what does this trend mean for your business? Expect your competition to be not only rival agencies and businesses, but you must also be weary of freelancers who are looking to take your clients and can do so at a lower price. Graphic design and PR will get cheaper as supply becomes more accessible as freelancers flood the market, while those still at agencies will likely feel a similar strain. However, top talent will still be attracted to top firms, and the compensation and perks will be there to compensate them for premium work.

Read the full article in Crain’s New York Business